WHAT IS HATRED?

 

 

 

 

WHAT IS HATRED?

The “Disaster” Tree of Hatred is about Mild, Slight, Moderate, and Extreme degrees of whatever is against the Spiritual Elements of Unconditional Love, Truth, Reality, and the Natural. Whereas African Tradition considers “Hate” as a “state” of mind cut-off from the Spiritual Elements, for Europeans, Hate speaks of an old, enduring flow—not of Human Nature as ancient Greeks said—but of acquired negative emotions which lack compassion or sorrow for those Targeted. Hate was not an issue for the peaceful and harmonious Ancient Africans but yet their recognition of it was in the form of the metaphorical god Set. In researching indexes to get a discussion of Hatred or Hostility in many European textbooks on Psychiatry, Psychology, Sociology, and related fields, I was amazed at the complete silence. The question is “Why?”–and an answer is not because of its lack of pervasiveness. Nevertheless, European dictionaries and etymology books say Hate’s original meaning was a ‘strong feeling’ (Indo-European); strong dislike (Germanic); and in Beowulf (725) as extreme dislike associated with such spite as for one to pursue the hunt in order to do harm—an idea brought into C14 English as “Heinous.” Accretions to these concepts included: Greek (Gk, kad, not caring), anxiety and grief; Old Irish both love and Hate (perhaps where the concept arose that the opposite of love is hate—a false concept in African Tradition); and synonyms for “Hate”–e.g. envy, sorrow, fear, and abhor. Rycroft (Psychoanalysis p68) says: hate is an affect characterized by an enduring wish to injure or destroy the hated object; Drever (Psychology p116): a sentiment (an emotional disposition of ones make-up) involving the whole gamut of primary emotions [not defined], but with anger, and often fear, predominating; Campbell (Psychiatric p18) object-directed representation of aggression and violence; Reber (Psychology p330): a desire to harm or cause pain to the object of emotion and feelings of pleasure from the object’s misfortunes; Warren (Psychology p121) extreme Aversion (a “turning away”). Hence, Hate is mind consuming.

It is helpful for me to think of the scenarios of Hate by the crude “Rule of Threes.” Scenario I: The “Crowd” is composed of those who love and create; those who drift; and those who hate and destroy. Scenario II: Since one fears something before hating it, the proximate cause of Hate is Fear. To elaborate, Children become haters by being taught to fear–or by imagining something fearful–or experiencing something fearful—each followed by hating. A child who fears noises becomes an adult who hates noise. Scenario III: Adults become haters of those whom they have hurt; from “going along with their crowd to get along”; and as a defense mechanism against all of their inner turmoil. Scenario IV: Receivers of Hate are those who return the Hate; those unaware of being Hated or do not care or find it beneficial; those who feel bad because of realizing Hatred is so unnecessary and simply makes all concerned feel needlessly bad. Scenario V: Hate thrives on Segregation—so as to withdraw ones hate into seclusion for spawning into fury for later spewing—so as to let the wall of glass prevent the linking of interrelationships between different “races”—so as to ensure not discovering that “those people” and you are more similar than different. This means “those people” are hated because of Willful Ignorance about their history, goals, struggles, achievements, and ways of doing things–and one will never know these as long as one hates them—and to be Indifferent is to be inhumane.

Scenario VI: Hate is not preservation and union, but destruction and separation; not happiness and well-being, but misery and being in the worse possible state; not about what disturbs Justice but what disturbs Order. Scenario VII: hateful acts are transferences to others of degradations one bears in oneself; or of entrenched greed; or from “sick” pleasures of power from annihilating. Scenario VIII: Hatred is medicine for the frustrated and by being the most accessible and comprehensive of all unifying agents, it serves as a cohesive among those with like-kind thoughts. Some then make it into a creative art form—perhaps to have themselves feared—perhaps as a test of personal strength to see how long/how intense they can hate one another but yet get along, or not—perhaps as a sporting “Excitement” challenge to get a return of hate since otherwise there is no point. Scenarios IX: People hate those causing them to feel inferior (from envy), intimidated, or wounded. jabaileymd.com