THE COIN CONCEPT

 

                                                     THE COIN CONCEPT
Pebbles, ancestors of the coin, were instrumental in Primitive Africans’ created Barter system. Such occurred when people in a certain area mutually agreed to recognize particular articles as possessing a general standard of Values. Very Ancient Africans recognized yellow metal, called gold, and expended their skill in fashioning from it ornaments and mediums of exchange. Those mediums were wedged-shaped (i.e. coins) and its “Value” was indicated by stamping designs on it. Coins were brought to the island of Crete by a group of highly advanced Eastern Black Africans called Keftiu prior to the Aryans’ (under the name of Greeks) appearance (c1800 BC). According to Herodotus, coins were widely issued in the east and west in C8 BC. By this time they had acquired various usages apart from symbolizing money (perhaps something like tossing a coin to see who goes first, as in football overtime). Today’s Coin is a piece of metal, usually flat and round. As a Material “Value” in the Physical World it has 5 parts–the Face (‘head’); the Reverse (the ‘tail”); letters around the border, the Legend; letters in the middle, the Inscription; and the Exergue (date, signature). However, its “Values” (embracing both Metaphysical and Physical Concepts) have a sixth part, the edge connecting the “Face” + “tail”–enabling Critical Thinking to use the Coin Concept many ways.
Examples: Group I–Some heads and tails are: (A) indivisible differences; (B) Complementary Equals in that they enhance each other; (C) Necessary opposites—i.e. one without the other is impossible; (D) perpetual, repeated periodical, intermittent, occasional, or rare partners; (E) of a Mild, Slight, Moderate, and Extreme degree of significance; (F) of a temporary, prolonged, or permanent duration; (G) are inversely proportional—i.e. opposite effects like employment and unemployment are usually opposites, as when one rises the other falls; (H) Predictions as steady or unsteady, consistent or inconsistent; (I)  Expectations based upon predictions, as expecting the worst from both equally or to a variable degree; and (J) Assessing how bad or good are the opposing sides. Group II concerns how the coin was put together—e.g. face/tail; same face (tail) or different faces (tails) on both sides of the same coin; Group III, the composition–dissimilar design but common substance; the same design but of different substances; different substances and different designs; Group IV, Purpose–do the same job–work independently but together for a common goal–independent workers doing different things to oppose each other, or Individualism, to ‘not be for or against the other’; Group V, coin assessments of both sides completely; or incomplete assessment; or assessing only one side completely or incompletely; Group VI, edge differences.
Group VII: “two sides of the same coin” applications–“Great opportunity and great danger are two sides of the same coin”: (1) a different way of thinking about something from both sides, as making rules is one thing and carrying them out is the other side of the coin; (2) an opposite way of thinking about something in considering both sides; (3) a viewing of two seemingly opposite problems or situations so closely connected as to really be just two parts of the same thing; (4) viewing the same subject two different ways—e.g. good/bad, pros/cons; (5) viewing each side of the coin as either good/good or bad/bad for different reasons; (6) the head and tail share common ground, as ones talent for music is a facility in mathematics; (7) the head and tail seem to be, or are different, but still closely related, as when people with different opinions think alike; (8) the head and tail seem to be, or are different, but are the same, as an argument may be two sides of the same coin; (9) the head and tails can be about Cause and Effect—deep insecurity can lead to violent behavior; (10) a given subject can be reflected upon differently to thereby come up with different things having the same or a different agenda; (11) there are always 2 parts or versions of the same thing—e.g. humans have a sameness but each is different; (12) different presentations from the head and tail of the same idea, as when there are different stories for the same event; (13) miscommunication, as in what is done by me is seen as something else by others; (14) heads and tails are associated—e.g. low income and poor health are two sides of the same coin; (15) synthesizing opposing sides. The Point: the Coin Concept applies to any big problem in the Background and Foreground aspects of ones life. jabaileymd.com