EUROPEAN ORIGIN OF “FEAR IN FAITH”

  

 

                                         EUROPEAN ORIGIN OF “FEAR IN FAITH”

Ancient Romans thought there were numina or spirits all around them which were to be treated with awe and fear. Spirit (Latin, spiritus, “breath”) was said to be the medium by which a transcendent Being has communion with a human being. European Christianity borrowed an Ancient African Bible concept of “Spirit” being transcendent and switching it from its Spiritual God Certainty by saying “non-rationally”: there is “something out there” bigger than we mortals “down here”; it can be otherworldly or this-worldly; and the Spirit is the inexplicable bridge between the human and the divine. From this, the German Rudolf Otto (1869-1937) built (with no basis!) the concept of “Numinous”—referring to the feelings aroused by a mysterious “something” that both horrifies one with dread and draws one to itself. The fear contained in this “penetrates to the very marrow” and yet it bestows a beatitude beyond compare—all of this being known by experiences which contain such fear. To accept this is the beginning of ones Numinous Faith. Thus, from its beginnings, the “Seed’s” common elements present in all the “Air Castle” “Roots” of—the Warriors, the Religious, and the Para-logical—was this “Fear in Faith” factor. The shared numinous experience—an inborn complex capacity but unique to each human—was described as a human’s feelings of self-nothingness and self-insufficiency which drives that human to find existential meaning (purely sensory or palpable aspects of experience). Both the presence of a sense of self-nothingness and self-insufficiency generate within that human a longing to reach a higher power to impart empowerment as its ongoing source. The Mysterium of the Numinous experience has a Tremendum aspect consisting of emotions of tremor and fear—itself composed of one feeling awfulness, majesty, and energy.

The ‘awfulness’ and ‘fear’ stem from ones feelings of personal self-nothingness, self-insufficiency, and submergence before the awe-inspiring “Thing” directly experienced. Together these lead to a dependency mindset on a higher power as well as a longing to give some meaning to ones life. Whatever Contingent Being one adopts produces a feeling of majesty, empowerment, and energy– symbolized by that human’s Will, personal power force, and activity directed toward the higher power source or away from it so as to become an independent “little god.” The latter, characteristic of European Warriors, causes each to believe he came into the world alone and will go out alone so that death ends it all for him. During his life, he shines a spotlight on what he wants—feeling that whatever is done to get it is ‘right’—because “the means justifies the end.” Nothing outside his interest has any importance whatsoever and neither does anyone except those he needs to get what he wants. The Contingent Being chosen (his own Ego) is both a value (e.g. the “excitement” of sought after Material “Things”) and an objective reality (e.g. the indulging of a human’s animalistic desires)—gained from visual experiences. In other words, ones immediate emotional response is to a primary reference experience of an object outside oneself but yet is not tied to any sense experience.

Another part of the Mysterium incorporates an element of fascination and wonderfulness—characterized by the ideas of comfort, optimism, tranquility, and salvation. These trigger the Religious “Air Castle” people to attempt to go beyond their daily living problems through self-transcendence for empowerment. By the “Supernatural” referring to an unknown system beyond the Cosmos, entities, or identities implies its psychological experience is to be found in its mystical (mist) aspects. But this too requires “Fear in Faith” because if one did not do things one was told to do, religious leaders declare God would strike them and make them burn in hell forever. Religions which emphasize these aspects do so to exploit Believers’ spiritual needs without satisfying them and to create a hierarchical system that pursues power and control. Such a Supernatural reaction is “Inside-Out” compared to the Natural World’s Spiritual concepts. Note that, in keeping with this line of belief, that God’s love is Conditional and God is vengeful for one not doing this or that. Otherwise, the beatitudes are kind. One can never know exactly when they are doing wrong when they are not intending to do so.[Ref: Adam Hood, The Expository Times, 2004; Baldacchino, Western Journal of Nursing Research, 2012; Lines, J Humanistic Psychology, 2002]jabaileymd.com