BLACK AMERICAN HISTORY (3)

 

BLACK AMERICAN HISTORY (3)

Black People, your foreign teachers have never told you the truth about anything! They do not know the Truth–do not care to know it—do not want you to know it—and do all they can to suppress its availability. Still, the falsehoods they teach need to be learned to pass examinations but African Truth needs to be known and internalized in order to overcome racism’s Selfhood degradation. This begins the path to a sense of well-being while thriving. The ‘big picture’ is that so many creations, inventions, discoveries, and innovations have come from the Black Mind as to make it is impossible to know them all, even those which managed to get through the European blockage filter. At a Black History Talk, as Sharon Bingaman and I told a church group on 2/22/15, one of the innumerable reasons for knowing true Black History is to reinforce the bonds with our Ancient African and Enslaved American Living-Dead Ancestors who still influence our lives. Let us deal here only with Black People’s Inventions—their other achievements are for other discussions. An Invention (‘find out’) is any new, creative, and useful mechanical contrivance or article, method, discovery, composition of matter or system not previously known or used. Discoveries (make known) spotlight what exists but nobody knows about. Innovations (alter, renew) add something new to what already exists as well as improve on any known machine, art, method, or system. We tend to think of inventions and Innovations as material “Things” about material “Things”–but they can also be non-material.  Examples of the latter include languages, songs, art forms, religious beliefs, games, political philosophers, rules, customs, myths, and family relationship patterns as shared societal happenings. When Black Minds “come on to something fascinating,” Images gathered prior and deposited in the memory are fabricated by interweaving known things and known principles. This pattern was imprinted as far back as Primitive Africans. They used it in the form of Affect Symbolic Imagery (stories concerning “Right” living) to teach children how to learn difficult things. In the process, the Black Mind sees on different planes of existence the common in the uncommon and the uncommon in the common. On the way to making novel products, processes, or forms of useful things having had no previous existence, all of those “materials” undergo arrangements/rearrangements–and combinations/recombination—and/or component integrations to arrive at option designs.

~~1600’S: Since the minds of the Enslaved were more focused on enduring and surviving, their creations where more in line with what would make their lives a little less terrible, at least for the moment. Perhaps the beginning of surviving the humiliating conditions of slavery came in the Enslaved finding some degree of pleasure in dancing, singing, and story-telling.  Each of these was characterized by distinct artistic expressions — expressions that have had an enduring influence on American life to this day. Uncle Remus stories presented a wide range of qualities — humor, tragedy, and morals–conveyed by animals as characters–a long tradition in Africa. Because fables illustrate human faults and virtues, Enslaved Afro-Americans used them as a teaching tool for their children and to “expose” Whites. Negro spirituals rank as classical displays of the Negroes’ experience and they served as the “Seeds” giving rise to work songs, ballads and blues.  Furthermore, they were often sung as hidden messages to help escapes of fellow Enslaved.  The words in one spiritual: “Everybody talkin ‘bout heaven ain’t going there” is something for all of us to really think about.

~~1700’S: PHYLLIS WHEATLEY (1753-1784), a literary genius, was able to read intelligently at age 8 the most difficult parts of the Bible. Born in Gambia, she was captured and was Enslaved at the age of 7. In 1773 became the first Enslaved female African American to be published. Her work helped lay the foundation for African American literature. She was versed in mythology, ancient history, and the English poets. In spite of obstacles, her inventive cleverness with words allowed her to gently scold the Whites for their support of Slavery.  She became skilled in poetry, history, and Latin to the point that her translation of Ovid’s Stories was published in English magazines. [main Ref.: Joseph A. Bailey, Sr.: “From Africa To Black Power”). jabaileymd.com